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TPO/TG antibodies test

The severity of autoimmune responses can be gauged by evaluating the number of antibodies in blood. The thyroid antibodies test is the primary test to diagnose a thyroid malfunctioning. The blood test weighs the number of antibodies in blood in comparison with those in the thyroid. The antibodies which are more common to treat Hashimoto’s are thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO) and thyroglobulin antibodies (TG).

This test comes in handy if one is suffering from Grave’s disease since it can detect Grave’s antibodies or TSH receptor antibodies. For most doctors, this is a common test and can easily prevent persistence or prevailing of this disease especially in the initial stages. It can also detect the infection even before there is a change in THS levels.

Recent studies show that about 90% of Hashimoto’s patients have thyroid peroxidase antibodies and also 80% of people will have thyroglobulin antibodies elevated above 35.

From the above, having antibodies levels of above 35 should warrant a change in lifestyle to reduce the numbers. A higher level also increases the possibility of developing hypothyroidism within the proceeding years. There are several means of gauging how well of one is against hypothyroidism; some websites can actually evaluate one’s thyroid antibodies levels and avert a possible risk of developing thyroid complications. As the notion goes, the more thyroid antibodies one has, they should be sure to have amplified attacks on their thyroid.

Serenogative Hashimoto’s is a recent upcoming trend. This implies that one may have healthy thyroid levels below 35 but still have Hashimoto’s.  Hashimoto’s is an attack on the thyroid by the immunity and sometimes can go unnoticed.

An ultrasound may be done to see any anomalies in the thyroid in relation to Hashimoto’s.  Most of the times, results of a tissue biopsy are not so conclusive or accurate and more tests are always done. Thyroid aspirations are extracted and examined under a microscope for abnormal tissues.

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